Venturing into darkness. Another three Sherry reviews

During the Sherry Twitter Tasting I wrote about earlier, we didn’t stop at two. Of course we didn’t as there is more than Fino and Manzanilla to come from that neck of the Spanish woods.

As we continued our Twitter assault and tried to become trending, I kept swearing and cursing everything Apple and Ipad related (I still believe the software is utter shite).

The Sherry we drank became more approachable. Not necessarily because it wasn’t the first drink of the evening anymore but also the flavours got more easy to comprehend. It was no longer based on olives, walnuts and seawater. It got more fruity, sweet and sticky.

Antique Palo Cortado, 20%, Bodegas Rey Fernando de Castilla
At first I got a massive hot of toffee and hazelnut praliné. Demerara sugar follows, as do stewed fruits, plums and dried apples. Soft cinnamon. It does get dry like the previous two, but it does take quite a while. The palate is thinner than I expected, more wine like and it has that yeast flavour I encountered earlier too. Dry, with a bitterness like raisin twigs. The finish has a sweetness that reminds me of some sherried Glengoynes. Wood, dryness, bitterness and hazelnut and toffee.

Palo Cortado. Image knicked from Sherrynotes.com

Palo Cortado. Image knicked from Sherrynotes.com

Oloroso ‘Pata de Gallina’, Juan Garcia Jarana, 20%, Lustau Almacenista 2003
It’s full and creamy, with caramac bars and plums. Also nuts, fruit and tawny port like scent on the nose. The palate is dry and comparable to the Palo Cortado, quite light and dry, with a hint of bitter caramel. The finish long, caramelly and has quite a lot of oaky flavours. It’s not very sweet, but has a flavour of dates.

Oloroso, image from Sherrynotes.com

Oloroso, image from Sherrynotes.com

Colosía Pedro Ximénez, 17%, Gutiérrez Colosía 2014
The only kind of sherry I have any experience with. Probably because the whisky people promote it the heaviest, and it’s lovable since it tastes like a Christmas dessert.

On the nose this one is not as sweet as I expected from previous encounters with PX, and it even has a weird sellery scent. Yellow raisins but also apples and pears. The palate is thick and treacly like some rums and ports I know and has flavours of raisins, dates, figs, coffee syrup. It’s ridiculously rich. The finish continues down this road and is as rich as expected, big and sweet, with dates and Choya, that Japanese plum wine (thanks for naming it, Gal).

PX to he max. Thanks to Ruben for the image.

PX to he max. Thanks to Ruben for the image.

This batch of wines was a little more approachable than the first two. That makes the order of wine a little strange to me, but the richness in the latter three does explain all. It’s pretty hard to taste anything after the PX, except for more PX.

I must say I loved the Oloroso and the Palo Cortado more than the PX. I find the overkill of sweetness on that does lower the complexity a little bit. After having a second glass of the Manzanilla I must say I came to like and enjoy that too, but it is an acquired taste. Strange stuff, this sherry. It needs some more exploration, and I think I will try to do that with some interesting ones I might be able to pick up here and there, and when I have some expectation of drinking the bottle before it goes bad.

About Sjoerd de Haan-Kramer

I'm a web developer at Emakina. I'm highly interested in booze, with a focus on whisk(e)y. I like to listen to loads of music and read quite some books. I'm married to Anneke, have a daughter Ot, a son Moos and a cat called Kikker (which means Frog, in Dutch). I live in Krommenie, The Netherlands.
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